WAM House

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A dynamic learning model is one in which many aspects of learning and teaching are put together to make the learning experience an enriching, engaging, active one. The WAM House Dynamic Learning model is comprised of a facilitated book/materials discussion typically done weekly over a meal, real-time life application, journaling, guest speakers, community involvement and application, and for those taking advantage of the community living component, a synergy and life-richness that results when like-minded people engage life experiences together in a close setting. The real-time life application component is experienced as participants take what they are learning through reading and discussion and try to apply it in their work environment. Participants are expected to work a minimum of 20 hours per week in the secular marketplace (this could be in any six of the seven spheres of culture- excluding Church.) They then discuss during the next session how what they are learning really applies to their workplace, what doesn’t, and what the bible, other biblically-based resources, peers, speakers, and mentors says about it. They wrestle together with the issues as they engage their culture and try to develop solutions together as they engage the issues in real life. (What are the seven spheres of culture? Media, Education, Government, Business, Church, Arts & Entertainment, and Social Sciences (medicine, social services, etc…)) The purpose of the dynamic learning model is to move the participants from theory to practice. To go from talking about how to do something to actually doing it with the support of others. The nine month program is divided up into six to nine week increments around major topic headings (see Courses.) The program starts the third week of September and goes through the end of June. 

Assessment Quiz

Journaling 

Jigsaw Reading 

Living Option

Internships Option

  

 Assessment Quiz

To take during the beginning of each term. This quiz covers topics which will be studied during the term and measures the participant’s familiarity with them. It is for assessment purposes only and is not a pass-fail type of quiz. 


Journaling

1. Reflection on reading or work recent work experience. Minimum one page typed, single spaced, 1” margins, 12 Times New Roman or Arial font.2. The format will roughly follow the questions, “What does the reading say?”, “What does it mean?” and “How can I apply it?”3. Submit two journal entries per month (see syllabus schedule). Email to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by Wednesday at noon. 4. Write one question in your journal that you would like to discuss.5. Blog entries. With your permission, we would like to use the journal entries on the WAM House 20Somethings Blog. Your thoughts and experiences can be a great source of encouragement to other Young Professionals who may be wrestling through the same questions or learning about similar issues. Please note in your email when you send the journal entry if you would be willing to share that particular entry on the blog site. For your first blog entry, include a short bio and picture. See www.20s.wamhouse.org for bio examples. For those with sensitive information and identity, may use pseudonyms and not use a picture on the blog.  


Jigsaw Reading

There will be times when we will use the “Jigsaw Reading” approach to our reading assignments.A jigsaw activity is a group activity in which each member is dependent on the others for part of the information. In other words, in order to complete a task, group members must cooperate.Components of Jigsaw Reading Assignments:1.     A book or chapter is divided into parts or topics.2.     Each member of the group is assigned or volunteers to read a part, looking for the main points, adding a couple of their thoughts concerning the content of what they have read, and developing a couple of questions they would like to present to the larger group upon reconvening.3.     Upon reconvening with the larger group, each member will have 15 minutes to orally share their main points, their thoughts, and questions and turn in the assignment typed, single spaced, 12 point Times New Roman, 1” margins. Advantages of the Jigsaw Method.
  1. One of the best ways to understand something is to teach it.
  2. It spreads out the reading work-load, allowing participants to cover more material in a shorter amount of time.
  3. It provides a level of accountability for reading assignments. Participants are depending on each other to do the reading and share the material with them.
  4. It provides a structured way for us to reflect on what we are reading. Example:
 

Jigsaw Reading Assignment

John Scroggins9/26/09Book: Money, Possessions and Eternity, by Randy AlcornAssigned reading: Introduction, pp. xv-xvi Main Points
  1. Money and Possessions are a spiritual battleground. How we use our money and possessions reflects who we serve: God or Satan; and which kingdom we are promoting: heaven or hell.
  2. The key to a right use of money and possessions is an eternal perspective with an understanding that there are eternal consequences.
  3. Our hearts should be open to the conviction of God’s prompting in how we think about money and possessions as we read the book.

 ThoughtsThe author makes some strong statements and gives no room for “that’s my perspective.” His emphasis on the importance of this topic really stood out to me and made me want to learn more, particularly how money and possessions have eternal impact. I’m looking forward to him fleshing out an explanation to the point, “What I do today has tremendous bearing on eternity. Indeed, it is the stuff of which eternity is made. The everyday choices I make regarding money and possessions are of eternal consequence.” QuestionsWhy are money and possessions a spiritual battleground?What is the eternal perspective and how do we gain an eternal perspective on this topic?   


Living Option

You must write or adopt a community living covenant. One is provided in this orientation booklet.  Q. What is “community-based living”?A. Although the WAM House residential component is not a boarding house for college students, and the WAM House is not a college, an example of community-based (residential) living arrangements is that of many college students. It is not at all uncommon for college students to rent an apartment together as they go to college in order to share costs and enjoy community with one another as they go through a similar life experience. (“Community” in the sense of a sharing together among friends, peers, and those pursuing some of the same goals, not in the sense of a civic-oriented type of greater community). Today, young adults are trending toward continuing to search out others after graduation, often based on similar life goals, worldviews, interests, etc…, who enjoy the value of experiencing life together in community by renting or owning a house together. <Learn more>

 

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